Inspiring images reveal beauty of engineering

Editorial

Rebecca Pool

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 11:00
Winners include striking SEM image of a flake of reduced graphene oxide [D T L Galhena]
 
UK-based University of Cambridge has unveiled the winners of this year's Engineering Photography Competition, sponsored by ZEISS.
 
First prize went to department technician, James Macleod for his stunning image of graphene being processed in alcohol to produce conductive ink.
 
First Prize: Graphene-IPA Ink [James Macleod]
 
Powdered graphite is mixed with alcohol and forced at high pressure through micrometre-scale diamond capillaries to rip apart the layers and give a smooth conductive material in solution ready for use in an ink-jet printer.
 
Second prize went to graduate student, Toby Call, for his false-colour SEM image of bacteria on a graphene-coated carbon foam anodic surface.
 
Second Prize: Rhodo graphene anode [Toby Call]
 
The bacteria (red) produce conductive nanowires to connect to the surface. Also captured in the top left of the image is protozoan ciliate that feed on the abundant electricity producing bacteria.
 
Other stunning images include a SEM image showing Carbon Nanotube growth from printed lines of a catalyst as well a further SEM image of a flake of reduced graphene oxide lying on the surface of reduced graphene oxide paper.
 
This SEM image shows carbon nanotube growth from printed iron oxide nanoparticles. The growth contains graphitic material and bundles of nanotubes. The image has been enhanced using Gimp software with the top crust of the forest shown in green, the CNT bundles shown in brown and the silicon substrate on which the forest was grown in blue. [Yoanna Shams]
 
The Polygon: a SEM image of a flake of reduced graphene oxide lying on the surface of reduced graphene oxide paper. One of the most effective ways of synthesising graphene based materials on a large scale, could be by the reduction of graphene oxide (GO). This image was false coloured using ImageJ. [D T L Galhena]
 
See more images here.
Website developed by S8080 Digital Media